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Joe K Gerald MD, PhD

Joe K Gerald MD, PhD

Associate Professor & Program Director, Public Health Policy & Management

Community, Environment & Policy Department

1295 N. Martin Avenue
Campus PO Box: 245210
Drachman Hall A227
Tucson, AZ 85724
(520) 626-4678
geraldj@email.arizona.edu

Biography

Joe Gerald, MD, PhD is a health services researcher whose area of interest is childhood asthma, cost-effectiveness analysis, and patient reported outcomes.  He earned a Doctor of Medicine (MD) from the University of South Alabama College of Medicine prior to completing a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Health Services Administration at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Dr. Gerald is an active member of the American Thoracic Society, a 15,000 member professional organization representing pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine physicians and researchers.  He serves on the society’s health policy committee and has co-authored society statements on comparative effectiveness research and implementation science.  He is an Associate Editor of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society, a journal targeting clinicians, clinical researchers, and medical educators.

Dr. Gerald is an experienced educator who has taught numerous undergraduate and graduate courses including Health Care in the US, Health Economics and Policy, and Interpreting the Public Health Literature.  He is a previous recipient of the Ellen-Gregg-Ingalls/UAB Alumni Society award for excellence in classroom teaching.

 

Research Synopsis

Dr. Gerald’s research has focused on the cost-effectiveness of respiratory-related interventions including tuberculosis contact screening and school-based asthma management.  His ongoing work include evaluating the cost-effectiveness of the Supervised Asthma Medicine in Schools program, a NHLBI-funded randomized controlled trial conducted in collaboration with the Tucson Unified School District.

Notable recent publications include “Albuterol Overuse: A Marker of Psychological Distress” and “Markers of Differential Response to Inhaled Corticosteroids among Children with Mild Persistent Asthma” published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.   He also wrote “Asthma Medications Should Be Available for Over-the-Counter Use,” published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

Curriculum Vitae: 

The University of Arizona