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Who Should Attend?

Rooted in global health practice and development as the overarching framework, this certificate program is especially designed to equip participants with the foundation knowledge and skills necessary to function and flourish effectively in global health practice, whether at home in a diverse setting, along the border in a bi-cultural environment, working side-by-side in indigenous homelands or abroad where populations and communities are displaced and under-resourced and where health systems are constrained.

With a major focus on working professionals, the program is designed as a flexible, internet-based, alternative for local, regional, national and foreign individuals working or intending to work with communities and/or organizations engaged in global health and development. It is especially designed for three groups of participants: i) individuals with a passion for health equity who have real-life experience but with limited relevant academic preparation ii) health and health-related professionals wishing to update and expand their knowledge and skills, but do not have the time or flexibility to undertake a campus-based academic degree program, iii) students in other disciplines who want to enrich your major with a global health & development world view. This course has relevance for professionals in public health, international relations, nursing, environmental sciences, anthropology, agriculture, sociology, biology, business and economics.

To ensure a flexible, unpressured, and yet top quality program, all courses are taught online. Ideally, students can expect to commit approximately 4-8 hours per week on each course, completing individual assignments and participating in discussion board forums. Online class activities are mostly asynchronous, and students can participate in these activities at times that are convenient to them, so long as the stipulated deadline for each activity is met. The program is designed to be completed in 12 months, but can be spaced out over an 18 month period.

The University of Arizona